What exactly happens when GFP fades?

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What exactly happens when GFP fades?

Postby Major_Grooves » Jun 04 2005 6:55 am

Hello! First post here. :)

I was just wondering what it is exactly that happens to the GFP protein when it fades due to photo-bleaching. Is is unfolding, being damaged?

ie if it is due to unfolding, if you leave it a while should it refold?

I guess the answer is the same for all fluorophores but I don't know what that is. :oops:

Thanks in advance for any help. :D
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Postby Major_Grooves » Jun 04 2005 7:00 am

Okay, approximately 3 seconds of searching later I find this:

The phenomenon of photobleaching (also commonly referred to as fading) occurs when a fluorophore permanently loses the ability to fluoresce due to photon-induced chemical damage and covalent modification. Upon transition from an excited singlet state to the excited triplet state, fluorophores may interact with another molecule to produce irreversible covalent modifications. The triplet state is relatively long-lived with respect to the singlet state, thus allowing excited molecules a much longer timeframe to undergo chemical reactions with components in the environment. The average number of excitation and emission cycles that occur for a particular fluorophore before photobleaching is dependent upon the molecular structure and the local environment. Some fluorophores bleach quickly after emitting only a few photons, while others that are more robust can undergo thousands or millions of cycles before bleaching. This interactive tutorial explores variations in photobleaching rates in single, dual, and multiply labeled fluorescence specimens.


From the Olympus site so there we go! :D
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